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Femoral exostosis causing vastus medialis pain in an active young lady: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

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Title
Femoral exostosis causing vastus medialis pain in an active young lady: a case report
Published in
BMC Research Notes, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1077-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neil Heron

Abstract

Musculoskeletal conditions are a common reason for consultation to General Practitioners (GPs)/family physicians in primary care. Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumours and usually occur in the metaphyseal region of long bones. Despite the distal femur being the commonest location to find these benign bone tumours, this is the first case report in the literature specifically describing vastus medialis muscle pain as the presenting symptom due to underlying bursa formation secondary to local pressure effects. Twenty nine year old female of white British ethnic origin, presenting to a primary care clinic with a three year history of intermittent left distal medial thigh pain. The benign bone tumour, femoral exostosis/osteochondroma, was diagnosed via Magnaetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and treated conservatively, with surgical excision an option if not resolving. GPs/family physicians need to be aware of this diagnosis and that femoral exostosis/osteochondroma can present to primary care physicians, particularly within the second decade of life.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Other 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Lecturer 1 7%
Librarian 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Psychology 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2015.
All research outputs
#13,737,330
of 22,797,621 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,787
of 4,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,093
of 263,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#36
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,797,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,262 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.