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Proficiency testing for bacterial whole genome sequencing: an end-user survey of current capabilities, requirements and priorities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
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4 tweeters

Citations

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51 Dimensions

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91 Mendeley
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Title
Proficiency testing for bacterial whole genome sequencing: an end-user survey of current capabilities, requirements and priorities
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0902-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacob Moran-Gilad, Vitali Sintchenko, Susanne Karlsmose Pedersen, William J Wolfgang, James Pettengill, Errol Strain, Rene S Hendriksen

Abstract

The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionised public health microbiology. Given the potential impact of NGS, it is paramount to ensure standardisation of 'wet' laboratory and bioinformatic protocols and promote comparability of methods employed by different laboratories and their outputs. Therefore, one of the ambitious goals of the Global Microbial Identifier (GMI) initiative ( http://www.globalmicrobialidentifier.org/ ) has been to establish a mechanism for inter-laboratory NGS proficiency testing (PT). This report presents findings from the survey recently conducted by Working Group 4 among GMI members in order to ascertain NGS end-use requirements and attitudes towards NGS PT. The survey identified the high professional diversity of laboratories engaged in NGS-based public health projects and the wide range of capabilities within institutions, at a notable range of costs. The priority pathogens reported by respondents reflected the key drivers for NGS use (high burden disease and 'high profile' pathogens). The performance of and participation in PT was perceived as important by most respondents. The wide range of sequencing and bioinformatics practices reported by end-users highlights the importance of standardisation and harmonisation of NGS in public health and underpins the use of PT as a means to assuring quality. The findings of this survey will guide the design of the GMI PT program in relation to the spectrum of pathogens included, testing frequency and volume as well as technical requirements. The PT program for external quality assurance will evolve and inform the introduction of NGS into clinical and public health microbiology practice in the post-genomic era.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 88 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 25%
Student > Master 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 3%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 16 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#11,730,342
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,143
of 6,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,638
of 235,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,719 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them