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A flexible approach to assess fluorescence decay functions in complex energy transfer systems

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biophysics, April 2015
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Title
A flexible approach to assess fluorescence decay functions in complex energy transfer systems
Published in
BMC Biophysics, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13628-015-0020-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christoph Roethlein, Markus S Miettinen, Zoya Ignatova

Abstract

Time-correlated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes molecular distances with greater accuracy than intensity-based calculation of FRET efficiency and provides a powerful tool to study biomolecular structure and dynamics. Moreover, time-correlated photon count measurements bear additional information on the variety of donor surroundings allowing more detailed differentiation between distinct structural geometries which are typically inaccessible to general fitting solutions. Here we develop a new approach based on Monte Carlo simulations of time-correlated FRET events to estimate the time-correlated single photon counts (TCSPC) histograms in complex systems. This simulation solution assesses the full statistics of time-correlated photon counts and distance distributions of fluorescently labeled biomolecules. The simulations are consistent with the theoretical predictions of the dye behavior in FRET systems with defined dye distances and measurements of randomly distributed dye solutions. We validate the simulation results using a highly heterogeneous aggregation system and explore the conditions to use this tool in complex systems. This approach is powerful in distinguishing distance distributions in a wide variety of experimental setups, thus providing a versatile tool to accurately distinguish between different structural assemblies in highly complex systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Unspecified 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Researcher 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 30%
Chemistry 3 30%
Unspecified 1 10%
Engineering 1 10%
Unknown 2 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,154,777
of 4,968,581 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biophysics
#41
of 49 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,230
of 148,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biophysics
#5
of 5 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 49 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one scored the same or higher as 8 of them.
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