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The relationship of weight change trajectory with medial temporal lobe atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease: results from a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
The relationship of weight change trajectory with medial temporal lobe atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease: results from a cohort study
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13195-015-0098-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erika Droogsma, Dieneke van Asselt, Hanneli Bieze, Nic Veeger, Peter Paul De Deyn

Abstract

Weight loss has been described in 20% to 45% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been associated with adverse outcomes. Various mechanisms for weight loss in AD patients have been proposed, though none has been proven. This study aimed to elucidate a mechanism of weight loss in AD patients by examining the hypothesis that weight loss is associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA). Patients from the Frisian Alzheimer's disease cohort study (a retrospective, longitudinal study of 576 community-dwelling AD patients) were included when a brain MRI was performed on which MTA could be assessed. To investigate the hypothesis that weight loss is associated with MTA, we investigated whether the trajectory of body weight change depends on the severity of MTA at the time of diagnosis (that is baseline). We hypothesized that patients with more severe MTA at baseline would have a lower body weight at baseline and a faster decrease in body weight during the course of the disease. The generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) was used to determine the relationship of weight change trajectory with MTA severity. In total, 214 patients (median age 79 years, median MMSE 23, mean weight 73.9 kg) were included. Patients with moderate, severe or very severe MTA at baseline weighed 3.2 to 6.8 kg more than patients with no or mild MTA. During the 3.5 years, patients gained on average 1.7 kg in body weight, irrespective of the severity of their MTA at baseline. We found no evidence that MTA is associated with weight loss in AD patients. Moreover, contrary to what was expected, AD patients did not lose but gained weight during follow-up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Psychology 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Linguistics 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 6 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2015.
All research outputs
#472,540
of 4,980,612 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#80
of 235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,876
of 148,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#11
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,980,612 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 235 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,882 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.