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Epigenome-wide association study of total serum immunoglobulin E in children: a life course approach

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Epigenome-wide association study of total serum immunoglobulin E in children: a life course approach
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0488-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheng Peng, Andres Cardenas, Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, Marie-France Hivert, Diane R. Gold, Thomas A. Platts-Mills, Xihong Lin, Emily Oken, Andrea A. Baccarelli, Augusto A. Litonjua, Dawn L. DeMeo

Abstract

IgE-mediated sensitization may be epigenetically programmed in utero, but early childhood environment may further alter complex traits and disease phenotypes through epigenetic plasticity. However, the epigenomic footprint underpinning IgE-mediated type-I hypersensitivity has not been well-understood, especially under a longitudinal early-childhood life-course framework. We used epigenome-wide DNA methylation (IlluminaHumanMethylation450 BeadChip) in cord blood and mid-childhood peripheral blood to investigate pre- and post-natal methylation marks associated with mid-childhood (age 6.7-10.2) total serum IgE levels in 217 mother-child pairs in Project Viva-a prospective longitudinal pre-birth cohort in eastern Massachusetts, USA. We identified methylation sites associated with IgE using covariate-adjusted robust linear regressions. Nineteen methylation marks in cord blood were associated with IgE in mid-childhood (FDR < 0.05) in genes implicated in cell signaling, growth, and development. Among these, two methylation sites (C7orf50, ZAR1) remained robust after the adjustment for the change in DNA methylation from birth to mid-childhood (FDR < 0.05). An analysis of the change in methylation between cord blood and mid-childhood DNA (Δ-DNAm) identified 395 methylation marks in 272 genes associated with mid-childhood IgE (FDR < 0.05), with multiple sites located within ACOT7 (4 sites), EPX (5 sites), EVL (3 sites), KSR1 (4 sites), ZFPM1 (3 sites), and ZNF862 (3 sites). Several of these methylation loci were previously associated with asthma (ADAM19, EPX, IL4, IL5RA, and PRG2). This study identified fetally programmed and mid-childhood methylation signals associated with mid-childhood IgE. Epigenetic priming during fetal development and early childhood likely plays an important role in IgE-mediated type-I hypersensitivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Other 4 12%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 11 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,598,629
of 15,922,732 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#442
of 845 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,841
of 279,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,732 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 845 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them