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High-salt in addition to high-fat diet may enhance inflammation and fibrosis in liver steatosis induced by oxidative stress and dyslipidemia in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, February 2015
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Title
High-salt in addition to high-fat diet may enhance inflammation and fibrosis in liver steatosis induced by oxidative stress and dyslipidemia in mice
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12944-015-0002-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuzaburo Uetake, Hitoshi Ikeda, Rie Irie, Kazuaki Tejima, Hiromitsu Matsui, Sayoko Ogura, Hong Wang, ShengYu Mu, Daigoro Hirohama, Katsuyuki Ando, Tatsuya Sawamura, Yutaka Yatomi, Toshiro Fujita, Tatsuo Shimosawa

Abstract

It is widely known that salt is an accelerating factor for the progression of metabolic syndrome and causes cardiovascular diseases, most likely due to its pro-oxidant properties. We hypothesized that excessive salt intake also facilitates the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is frequently associated with metabolic syndrome. We examined the exacerbating effect of high-salt diet on high-fat diet-induced liver injury in a susceptible model to oxidative stress, apoE knockout and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) transgenic mice. High-salt diet led to NASH in high-fat diet-fed LOX-1 transgenic/apoE knockout mice without affecting high-fat diet-induced dyslipidemia or hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Additionally, a high-salt and high-fat diet stimulated oxidative stress production and inflammatory reaction to a greater extent than did a high-fat diet in the liver of LOX-1 transgenic/apoE knockout mice. We demonstrated that high-salt diet exacerbated NASH in high-fat diet-fed LOX-1 transgenic /apoE knockout mice and that this effect was associated with the stimulation of oxidative and inflammatory processes; this is the first study to suggest the important role of excessive salt intake in the development of NASH.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Philosophy 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,198,326
of 5,021,372 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#464
of 550 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,759
of 151,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#17
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,021,372 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 550 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.