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Evaluating the performance of anchored hybrid enrichment at the tips of the tree of life: a phylogenetic analysis of Australian Eugongylus group scincid lizards

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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57 Dimensions

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137 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating the performance of anchored hybrid enrichment at the tips of the tree of life: a phylogenetic analysis of Australian Eugongylus group scincid lizards
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0318-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew C Brandley, Jason G Bragg, Sonal Singhal, David G Chapple, Charlotte K Jennings, Alan R Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Michael B Thompson, Craig Moritz

Abstract

High-throughput sequencing using targeted enrichment and transcriptomic methods enables rapid construction of phylogenomic data sets incorporating hundreds to thousands of loci. These advances have enabled access to an unprecedented amount of nucleotide sequence data, but they also pose new questions. Given that the loci targeted for enrichment are often highly conserved, how informative are they at different taxonomic scales, especially at the intraspecific / phylogeographic scale? We investigate this question using Australian scincid lizards in the Eugongylus group (Squamata: Scincidae). We sequenced 415 anchored hybrid enriched loci for 43 individuals and mined 1650 exons (1648 loci) from transcriptomes (transcriptome mining) from 11 individuals, including multiple phylogeographic lineages within several species of Carlia, Lampropholis, and Saproscincus skinks. We assessed the phylogenetic information content of these loci at the intergeneric, interspecific, and phylogeographic scales. As a further test of the utility at the phylogeographic scale, we used the anchor hybrid enriched loci to infer lineage divergence parameters using coalescent models of isolation with migration. Phylogenetic analyses of both data sets inferred very strongly supported trees at all taxonomic levels. Further, AHE loci yielded estimates of divergence times between closely related lineages that were broadly consistent with previous population-level analyses. Anchored-enriched loci are useful at the deep phylogeny and phylogeographic scales. Although overall phylogenetic support was high throughout the Australian Eugongylus group phylogeny, there were nonetheless some conflicting or unresolved relationships, especially regarding the placement of Pseudemoia, Cryptoblepharus, and the relationships amongst closely-related species of Tasmanian Niveoscincus skinks.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Spain 3 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 122 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 26%
Researcher 28 20%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 16 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 93 68%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 14%
Chemistry 2 1%
Environmental Science 2 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 19 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,500,028
of 14,195,901 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#816
of 2,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,840
of 226,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,195,901 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,595 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,514 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them