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Altruism, Scepticism, and collective decision-making in foreign-born U.S. residents in a tuberculosis vaccine trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Altruism, Scepticism, and collective decision-making in foreign-born U.S. residents in a tuberculosis vaccine trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5460-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sienna R. Craig, Timothy Lahey, Apoorva Dixit, C. Fordham von Reyn

Abstract

The current vaccine against tuberculosis, BCG, is effective when given in most TB-endemic countries at birth but has diminished efficacy against pulmonary TB after 15-20 years. As a result, new booster vaccines for adolescents and adults are being developed to realize the World Health Organization target of global elimination of TB by 2035. Multiple TB candidates thus are in active clinical development. One of these, DAR-901, is advancing in human clinical trials. These clinical trials are conducted in BCG immunized adults with and without HIV infection in order to assess safety and efficacy among the people most in need of a new vaccine. A Phase I dose escalation trial of DAR-901 in BCG-immunized adults with or without HIV infection was conducted between 2014 and 2016. This offered an unusual opportunity to qualitatively examine why foreign-born adults living in the United States - a poorly studied population - decide to participate, or not, in clinical trials. We conducted a qualitative study of individuals who were recruited to participate in this Phase I vaccine trial, interviewing those who agreed and declined to participate. We found diverse motivations for participation or refusal; varied understandings of tuberculosis and vaccines; and complex views about how 'informed consent' can be at odds with cultural understandings of power, authority, and medical decision-making. These dynamics included: knowledge (direct or indirect) of tuberculosis, a desire to be altruistic and simultaneous hopes for personal gain as well as concerns over what remuneration for participation could mean, the importance of personal relationships with care providers in shaping volunteerism, concerns over privacy, and evidence of how culture and history shape medical decision-making. This US-based trial, aimed at addressing a crucible global health issue, raises productive questions about the interface between altruism and scepticism regarding clinical research participation. NCT02063555 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Researcher 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 23 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Engineering 3 4%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 28 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,125,229
of 12,846,518 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,586
of 8,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,806
of 269,847 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,846,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,747 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,847 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them