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New-born females show higher stress- and genotype-independent methylation of SLC6A4 than males

Overview of attention for article published in Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, April 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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Title
New-born females show higher stress- and genotype-independent methylation of SLC6A4 than males
Published in
Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40479-015-0029-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helene Dukal, Josef Frank, Maren Lang, Jens Treutlein, Maria Gilles, Isabell AC Wolf, Bertram Krumm, Renaud Massart, Moshe Szyf, Manfred Laucht, Michael Deuschle, Marcella Rietschel, Stephanie H Witt

Abstract

Research has demonstrated an association between exposure to early life stress and an increased risk of psychiatric disorders in later life, in particular depression. However, the mechanism through which early life stress contributes to disease development remains unclear. Previous studies have reported an association between early life stress and altered methylation of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), a key candidate gene for several psychiatric disorders. These differences in methylation are influenced by sex and genetic variation in the SLC6A4-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). Furthermore, one study indicated that stress during pregnancy may induce methylation changes in SLC6A4 in the newborn. The present study is the first to investigate whether early life stress during pregnancy impacts on SLC6A4 methylation in newborns, taking into account the influence of genetic variation and sex. Cord blood was obtained from newborns with high (n = 45) or low (n = 45) early life stress, defined as maternal stress during pregnancy. The effect on methylation of early life stress, 5-HTTLPR genotype, and sex was assessed at four cytosin-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites in the promoter associated CpG island north shore (CpG 1 to 4). The epigenetic analyses focused on these CpG sites, since research has shown that CpG island shore methylation has functional consequences. Significant sex-specific methylation was observed, with females displaying higher methylation levels than males (p < 0.001). Importantly, this effect was influenced by neither early life stress nor genotype. The present data suggest that sex-specific methylation of SLC6A4 is present at birth, and is independent of early life stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype. This may contribute to the sex-specific prevalence of depression.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Croatia 1 2%
Turkey 1 2%
Luxembourg 1 2%
Unknown 55 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Other 6 10%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 15%
Psychology 7 12%
Neuroscience 6 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 15 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,384,403
of 6,882,666 outputs
Outputs from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#21
of 45 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,438
of 186,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,882,666 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 45 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one scored the same or higher as 24 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,892 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.