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High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 485)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
51 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
184 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
522 Mendeley
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Title
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40560-015-0084-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masaji Nishimura

Abstract

High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy comprises an air/oxygen blender, an active humidifier, a single heated circuit, and a nasal cannula. It delivers adequately heated and humidified medical gas at up to 60 L/min of flow and is considered to have a number of physiological effects: reduction of anatomical dead space, PEEP effect, constant fraction of inspired oxygen, and good humidification. While there have been no big randomized clinical trials, it has been gaining attention as an innovative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Most of the available data has been published in the neonatal field. Evidence with critically ill adults are poor; however, physicians apply it to a variety of patients with diverse underlying diseases: hypoxemic respiratory failure, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, post-extubation, pre-intubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, patients with do-not-intubate order, and so on. Many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces needs of escalation of respiratory support in patients with diverse underlying diseases. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as its indication, timing of starting and stopping HFNC, and escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC oxygen therapy is an innovative and effective modality for the early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 522 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 513 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 77 15%
Researcher 61 12%
Student > Bachelor 58 11%
Student > Postgraduate 54 10%
Student > Master 51 10%
Other 124 24%
Unknown 97 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 293 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 56 11%
Engineering 11 2%
Social Sciences 5 <1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 <1%
Other 30 6%
Unknown 122 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2021.
All research outputs
#682,534
of 21,376,549 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#20
of 485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,076
of 194,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,376,549 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 485 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them