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Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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103 Dimensions

Readers on

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172 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0930-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruce E Hirsch, Nimit Saraiya, Kaitlin Poeth, Rebecca M Schwartz, Marcia E Epstein, Gerard Honig

Abstract

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a complication of antibiotic-induced injury to the gut microbiome, is a prevalent and dangerous cause of infectious diarrhea. Antimicrobial therapy for CDI is typically effective for acute symptoms, but up to one third of patients later experience recurrent CDI. Fecal-derived microbiota transplantation (FMT) can ameliorate the underlying dysbiosis and is highly effective for recurrent CDI. Traditional methods of FMT are limited by patient discomfort, risk and inefficient procedures. Many individuals with recurrent CDI have extensive comorbidities and advanced age. Widespread use of FMT requires strategies that are non-invasive, scalable and applicable across healthcare settings. A method to facilitate microbiota transfer was developed. Fecal samples were collected and screened for potential pathogens. Bacteria were purified, concentrated, cryopreserved and formulated into multi-layered capsules. Capsules were administered to patients with recurrent CDI, who were then monitored for 90 days. Thirteen women and six men with recurrent CDI were provided with microbiota transfer with orally administered capsules. The procedure was well tolerated. Thirteen individuals responded to a single course. Four patients were cured after a second course. There were 2 failures. The cumulative clinical cure rate of 89% is similar to the rates achieved with reported fecal-derived transplantation procedures. Recurrent CDI represents a profound dysbiosis and a debilitating chronic disease. Stable cure can be achieved by restoring the gut microbiome with an effective, well-tolerated oral capsule treatment. This strategy of microbiota transfer can be widely applied and is particularly appropriate for frail patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 169 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 21%
Student > Bachelor 24 14%
Student > Master 18 10%
Student > Postgraduate 15 9%
Other 15 9%
Other 38 22%
Unknown 26 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 55 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 6%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 35 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2016.
All research outputs
#4,228,444
of 14,381,119 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,377
of 5,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,442
of 229,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,381,119 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,348 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them