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Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, April 2015
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Title
Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report
Published in
Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13032-015-0024-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nils Christian Utheim, Roger Josefsen, Per Hjalmar Nakstad, Torfinn Solgaard, Olav Roise

Abstract

Lower cranial nerve (IX-XII) palsy is a rare condition with numerous causes, usually non-traumatic. In the literature it has been described only a few times after trauma, mostly accompanied by a fracture of the occipital condyle. Although these types of fractures have rarely been reported one could suspect they have been under-diagnosed. During the past decade they have been seen more frequently, most probably due to increased use of CT- and MRI-scanning. The purpose of this review is to increase the awareness of complications following injuries in the craniocervical region. We based this article on a retrospective review of the medical record of a 24-year old woman admitted to our trauma center after being involved in a car accident and a review of the literature on occipital condyle fractures associated with lower cranial nerve palsy. The multitraumatized patient had suffered a dislocated occipital condyle fracture. Months later she was diagnosed with palsy to cranial nerve IX-XII. Literature review shows that occipital condyle fractures are rare as isolated injuries and are in many cases accompanied by further injuries to the cervical spine and soft tissue structures, in many cases ending with severe disability. The exact mechanism leading to these injuries cannot always be explained. Recognition of soft tissue injuries in patients with blunt head trauma is important. CT findings involving the craniocervical junction in these patients advocates further investigations including a thorough neurological examination and liberal use of MRI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 20%
Researcher 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 53%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,657,491
of 5,005,300 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#22
of 44 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,282
of 153,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,005,300 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one scored the same or higher as 22 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 153,626 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them