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A prospective study of Helicobacter pylori in relation to the risk for pancreatic cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2008
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Title
A prospective study of Helicobacter pylori in relation to the risk for pancreatic cancer
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2008
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-8-321
Pubmed ID
Authors

Björn Lindkvist, Dorthe Johansen, Anders Borgström, Jonas Manjer

Abstract

The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and pancreatic cancer has been investigated in three previous studies with contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between H. pylori seropositivity and the risk for pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study within a population based cohort. Selected birth-year cohorts (born 1921-1949) of residents in Malmö, Sweden, were invited to a health screening investigation. A total of 33 346 subjects participated. Cases with pancreatic cancer (n = 87) were matched to controls (n = 263) using age, sex and time for baseline investigation as matching variables. H. pylori serology was analysed in stored serum samples using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Odds ratios (OR) for pancreatic cancer were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with pancreatic cancer in the total cohort (adjusted OR 1.25 (0.75-2.09)). However, a statistically significant association was found in never smokers (OR 3.81 (1.06-13.63) adjusted for alcohol consumption) and a borderline statistically significant association was found in subjects with low alcohol consumption (OR 2.13 (0.97-4.69) adjusted for smoking). We conclude that no association between H. pylori infection and the risk for pancreatic cancer was found in the total cohort. However, in never smokers and in subjects with low risk alcohol consumption, a positive H. pylori serology was associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer. These findings should be interpreted cautiously due to the limited number of cases in these subgroups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Master 5 13%
Other 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Computer Science 2 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,541,852
of 5,007,280 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,749
of 2,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,042
of 153,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#136
of 187 outputs
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