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Occupational factors and subsequent major depressive and generalized anxiety disorders in the prospective French national SIP study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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53 Dimensions

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105 Mendeley
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Title
Occupational factors and subsequent major depressive and generalized anxiety disorders in the prospective French national SIP study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1559-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Niedhammer, Lucile Malard, Jean-François Chastang

Abstract

The literature has been extensive on the associations between psychosocial work factors and mental health. Nevertheless, the studies using prospective design, various concepts and more than one measurement point in time for these factors and diagnostic interview to assess mental disorders remain seldom in the literature. This study is an attempt to fill the gap in this topic. The study was based on a national representative sample of 4717 workers of the French working population (SIP survey), interviewed in 2006 and reinterviewed again in 2010 and free of mental disorders at baseline. Psychosocial work factors, measured in both 2006 and 2010, included: psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, reward, emotional demands, role conflict, ethical conflict, tensions with the public, job insecurity and work-life imbalance. Other occupational factors related to working time/hours and physical work environment were also studied. Major depressive (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorders (GAD) were measured using a standardised diagnostic interview (MINI). Covariates were age, occupation, marital status, having a child under 3 y, social support outside work and stressful life events. Multivariate analyses were performed using weighted logistic regression models. Using models taking all occupational factors into account simultaneously, low reward and job insecurity predicted MDD. Psychological demands, low reward, emotional demands and job insecurity were predictive of GAD. The more frequent the exposure to job insecurity, the higher the risk of MDD and GAD, and the more frequent the exposure to psychological demands and low reward, the higher the risk of GAD. No effect was observed for repeated exposure to occupational factors. Classical and emergent psychosocial work factors were predictive factors of depression and anxiety with dose-response associations in terms of frequency of exposure. More attention may be needed on emergent psychosocial work factors and frequent exposure to these factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 103 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 20%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 6 6%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 27 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 27 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 17%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 4%
Other 8 8%
Unknown 33 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,491,466
of 5,021,506 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,709
of 5,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,269
of 154,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#154
of 217 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,021,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,903 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 217 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.