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A model for presenting accelerometer paradata in large studies: ISCOLE

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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116 Mendeley
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Title
A model for presenting accelerometer paradata in large studies: ISCOLE
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0213-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catrine Tudor-Locke, Emily F Mire, Kara N Dentro, Tiago V Barreira, John M Schuna, Pei Zhao, Mark S Tremblay, Martyn Standage, Olga L Sarmiento, Vincent Onywera, Tim Olds, Victor Matsudo, José Maia, Carol Maher, Estelle V Lambert, Anura Kurpad, Rebecca Kuriyan, Gang Hu, Mikael Fogelholm, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Timothy S Church, Peter T Katzmarzyk

Abstract

We present a model for reporting accelerometer paradata (process-related data produced from survey administration) collected in the International Study of Childhood Obesity Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE), a multi-national investigation of >7000 children (averaging 10.5 years of age) sampled from 12 different developed and developing countries and five continents. ISCOLE employed a 24-hr waist worn 7-day protocol using the ActiGraph GT3X+. Checklists, flow charts, and systematic data queries documented accelerometer paradata from enrollment to data collection and treatment. Paradata included counts of consented and eligible participants, accelerometers distributed for initial and additional monitoring (site specific decisions in the face of initial monitoring failure), inadequate data (e.g., lost/malfunction, insufficient wear time), and averages for waking wear time, valid days of data, participants with valid data (≥4 valid days of data, including 1 weekend day), and minutes with implausibly high values (≥20,000 activity counts/min). Of 7806 consented participants, 7372 were deemed eligible to participate, 7314 accelerometers were distributed for initial monitoring and another 106 for additional monitoring. 414 accelerometer data files were inadequate (primarily due to insufficient wear time). Only 29 accelerometers were lost during the implementation of ISCOLE worldwide. The final locked data file consisted of 6553 participant files (90.0% relative to number of participants who completed monitoring) with valid waking wear time, averaging 6.5 valid days and 888.4 minutes/day (14.8 hours). We documented 4762 minutes with implausibly high activity count values from 695 unique participants (9.4% of eligible participants and <0.01% of all minutes). Detailed accelerometer paradata is useful for standardizing communication, facilitating study management, improving the representative qualities of surveys, tracking study endpoint attainment, comparing studies, and ultimately anticipating and controlling costs. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01722500.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Unknown 114 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 21%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Researcher 10 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 6%
Other 25 22%
Unknown 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 25%
Sports and Recreations 14 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Computer Science 5 4%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 29 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,210,947
of 19,088,857 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#896
of 1,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,908
of 239,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,088,857 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,748 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them