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Complex evolution of the GSTM gene family involves sharing of GSTM1 deletion polymorphism in humans and chimpanzees

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Complex evolution of the GSTM gene family involves sharing of GSTM1 deletion polymorphism in humans and chimpanzees
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4676-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Saitou, Y. Satta, O. Gokcumen, T. Ishida

Abstract

The common deletion of the glutathione S-transferase Mu 1 (GSTM1) gene in humans has been shown to be involved in xenobiotic metabolism and associated with bladder cancer. However, the evolution of this deletion has not been investigated. In this study, we conducted comparative analyses of primate genomes. We demonstrated that the GSTM gene family has evolved through multiple structural variations, involving gene duplications, losses, large inversions and gene conversions. We further showed experimentally that the GSTM1 was polymorphically deleted in both humans and also in chimpanzees, through independent deletion events. To generalize our results, we searched for genic deletions that are polymorphic in both humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, we found only two such deletions among the thousands that we have searched, one of them being the GSTM1 deletion and the other surprisingly being another metabolizing gene, the UGT2B17. Overall, our results support the emerging notion that metabolizing gene families, such as the GSTM, NAT, UGT and CYP, have been evolving rapidly through gene duplication and deletion events in primates, leading to complex structural variation within and among species with unknown evolutionary consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Other 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Chemistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2020.
All research outputs
#8,693,968
of 16,791,453 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#3,538
of 9,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,442
of 282,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#6
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,791,453 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,134 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.