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Impact on birth weight of maternal smoking throughout pregnancy mediated by DNA methylation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
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Title
Impact on birth weight of maternal smoking throughout pregnancy mediated by DNA methylation
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4652-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie H. Witt, Josef Frank, Maria Gilles, Maren Lang, Jens Treutlein, Fabian Streit, Isabell A. C. Wolf, Verena Peus, Barbara Scharnholz, Tabea S. Send, Stefanie Heilmann-Heimbach, Sugirthan Sivalingam, Helene Dukal, Jana Strohmaier, Marc Sütterlin, Janine Arloth, Manfred Laucht, Markus M. Nöthen, Michael Deuschle, Marcella Rietschel

Abstract

Cigarette smoking has severe adverse health consequences in adults and in the offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy. One of the most widely reported effects of smoking during pregnancy is reduced birth weight which is in turn associated with chronic disease in adulthood. Epigenome-wide association studies have revealed that smokers show a characteristic "smoking methylation pattern", and recent authors have proposed that DNA methylation mediates the impact of maternal smoking on birth weight. The aims of the present study were to replicate previous reports that methylation mediates the effect of maternal smoking on birth weight, and for the first time to investigate whether the observed mediation effects are sex-specific in order to account for known sex-specific differences in methylation levels. Methylation levels in the cord blood of 313 newborns were determined using the Illumina HumanMethylation450K Beadchip. A total of 5,527 CpG sites selected on the basis of evidence from the literature were tested. To determine whether the observed association between maternal smoking and birth weight was attributable to methylation, mediation analyses were performed for significant CpG sites. Separate analyses were then performed in males and females. Following quality control, 282 newborns eventually remained in the analysis. A total of 25 mothers had smoked consistently throughout the pregnancy. The birthweigt of newborns whose mothers had smoked throughout pregnancy was reduced by >200g. After correction for multiple testing, 30 CpGs showed differential methylation in the maternal smoking subgroup including top "smoking methylation pattern" genes AHRR, MYO1G, GFI1, CYP1A1, and CNTNAP2. The effect of maternal smoking on birth weight was partly mediated by the methylation of cg25325512 (PIM1); cg25949550 (CNTNAP2); and cg08699196 (ITGB7). Sex-specific analyses revealed a mediating effect for cg25949550 (CNTNAP2) in male newborns. The present data replicate previous findings that methylation can mediate the effect of maternal smoking on birth weight. The analysis of sex-dependent mediation effects suggests that the sex of the newborn may have an influence. Larger studies are warranted to investigate the role of both the identified differentially methylated loci and the sex of the newborn in mediating the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and birth weight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Master 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 5 6%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 23 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 30 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2018.
All research outputs
#5,094,690
of 18,008,158 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,501
of 9,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,360
of 287,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#5
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,008,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,506 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.