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piRNA involvement in genome stability and human cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hematology & Oncology, April 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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91 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
piRNA involvement in genome stability and human cancer
Published in
Journal of Hematology & Oncology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13045-015-0133-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miguel Moyano, Giovanni Stefani

Abstract

PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a large family of small, single-stranded, non-coding RNAs present throughout the animal kingdom. They form complexes with several members of the PIWI clade of Argonaute proteins and carry out regulatory functions. Their best established biological role is the inhibition of transposon mobilization, which they enforce both at the transcriptional level, through regulation of heterochromatin formation, and by promoting transcript degradation. In this capacity, piRNAs and PIWI proteins are at the heart of the germline cells' efforts to preserve genome integrity. Additional regulatory roles of piRNAs and PIWI proteins in gene expression are becoming increasingly apparent.PIWI proteins and piRNAs are often detected in human cancers deriving from germline cells as well as somatic tissues. Their detection in cancer correlates with poorer clinical outcomes, suggesting that they play a functional role in the biology of cancer. Nonetheless, the currently available information, while highly suggestive, is still not sufficient to entirely discriminate between a 'passenger' role for the ectopic expression of piRNAs and PIWI proteins in cancer from a 'driver' role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In this article, we review some of the key available evidence for the role of piRNAs and PIWI in human cancer and discuss ways in which our understanding of their functions may be improved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Unknown 111 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 24%
Researcher 23 21%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Postgraduate 5 4%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 14 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Computer Science 4 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,669,118
of 5,026,115 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#97
of 233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,362
of 155,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#13
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,026,115 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 233 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.