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Virulence related sequences; insights provided by comparative genomics of Streptococcus uberis of differing virulence

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

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10 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Virulence related sequences; insights provided by comparative genomics of Streptococcus uberis of differing virulence
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1512-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maqsud Hossain, Sharon A Egan, Tracey Coffey, Philip N Ward, Ray Wilson, James A Leigh, Richard D Emes

Abstract

Streptococcus uberis, a Gram-positive, catalase-negative member of the family Streptococcaceae is an important environmental pathogen responsible for a significant proportion of subclinical and clinical bovine intramammary infections. Currently, the genome of only a single reference strain (0140J) has been described. Here we present a comparative analysis of complete draft genome sequences of an additional twelve S. uberis strains. Pan and core genome analysis revealed the core genome common to all strains to be 1,550 genes in 1,509 orthologous clusters, complemented by 115-246 accessory genes present in one or more S. uberis strains but absent in the reference strain 0140J. Most of the previously predicted virulent genes were present in the core genome of all 13 strains but gene gain/loss was observed between the isolates in CDS associated with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), prophage and bacteriocin production. Experimental challenge experiments confirmed strain EF20 as non-virulent; only able to infect in a transient manner that did not result in clinical mastitis. Comparison of the genome sequence of EF20 with the validated virulent strain 0140J identified genes associated with virulence, however these did not relate clearly with clinical/non-clinical status of infection. The gain/loss of mobile genetic elements such as CRISPRs and prophage are a potential driving force for evolutionary change. This first "whole-genome" comparison of strains isolated from clinical vs non-clinical intramammary infections including the type virulent vs non-virulent strains. This comparison did not identify simple gene gain/loss rules that readily explain, or be confidently associated with, differences in virulence. This suggests that a more complex dynamic determines infection potential and clinical outcome not simply gene content.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 21%
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Master 4 6%
Professor 3 5%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 34%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,604,573
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,060
of 9,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,759
of 239,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,730 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
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