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Ready-to-use therapeutic food with elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content, with or without fish oil, to treat severe acute malnutrition: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
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Title
Ready-to-use therapeutic food with elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content, with or without fish oil, to treat severe acute malnutrition: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Medicine, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0315-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelsey DJ Jones, Rehema Ali, Maureen A Khasira, Dennis Odera, Annette L West, Grielof Koster, Peter Akomo, Alison WA Talbert, Victoria M Goss, Moses Ngari, Johnstone Thitiri, Said Ndoro, Miguel A Garcia Knight, Kenneth Omollo, Anne Ndungu, Musa M Mulongo, Paluku Bahwere, Greg Fegan, John O Warner, Anthony D Postle, Steve Collins, Philip C Calder, James A Berkley

Abstract

Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) are lipid-based pastes widely used in the treatment of acute malnutrition. Current specifications for RUTF permit a high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content and low n-3 PUFA, with no stipulated requirements for preformed long-chain n-3 PUFA. The objective of this study was to develop an RUTF with elevated short-chain n-3 PUFA and measure its impact, with and without fish oil supplementation, on children's PUFA status during treatment of severe acute malnutrition. This randomized controlled trial in children with severe acute malnutrition in rural Kenya included 60 children aged 6 to 50 months who were randomized to receive i) RUTF with standard composition; ii) RUTF with elevated short chain n-3 PUFA; or iii) RUTF with elevated short chain n-3 PUFA plus fish oil capsules. Participants were followed-up for 3 months. The primary outcome was erythrocyte PUFA composition. Erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content declined from baseline in the two arms not receiving fish oil. Erythrocyte long-chain n-3 PUFA content following treatment was significantly higher for participants in the arm receiving fish oil than for those in the arms receiving RUTF with elevated short chain n-3 PUFA or standard RUTF alone: 3 months after enrolment, DHA content was 6.3% (interquartile range 6.0-7.3), 4.5% (3.9-4.9), and 3.9% (2.4-5.7) of total erythrocyte fatty acids (P <0.001), respectively, while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content was 2.0% (1.5-2.6), 0.7% (0.6-0.8), and 0.4% (0.3-0.5) (P <0.001). RUTF with elevated short chain n-3 PUFA and fish oil capsules were acceptable to participants and carers, and there were no significant differences in safety outcomes. PUFA requirements of children with SAM are not met by current formulations of RUTF, or by an RUTF with elevated short-chain n-3 PUFA without additional preformed long-chain n-3 PUFA. Clinical and growth implications of revised formulations need to be addressed in large clinical trials. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01593969 . Registered 4 May 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 2 1%
Unknown 155 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 19%
Student > Master 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 9%
Other 12 8%
Other 32 20%
Unknown 26 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 11%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 36 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,507,343
of 14,566,946 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,096
of 2,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,188
of 227,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,566,946 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,278 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,397 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them