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Growth inhibitory and chemo-sensitization effects of naringenin, a natural flavanone purified from Thymus vulgaris, on human breast and colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Cell International, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 337)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
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Title
Growth inhibitory and chemo-sensitization effects of naringenin, a natural flavanone purified from Thymus vulgaris, on human breast and colorectal cancer
Published in
Cancer Cell International, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12935-015-0194-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamed Salah I Abaza, Khaled Y Orabi, Ebtehal Al-Quattan, Raja’a J Al-Attiyah

Abstract

Natural products with diverse bioactivities are becoming an important source of novel agents with medicinal potential. Cancer is a devastating disease that causes the death of millions of people each year. Thus, intense research has been conducted on several natural products to develop novel anticancer drugs. Chromatographic and spectral techniques were used for the isolation and identification of naringenin (Nar). MTT, flow cytometry, western blotting, Real Time PCR were used to test anticancer and chemosensitizing effects of Nar, cell cycle, apoptosis, and expression of cell cycle, apoptosis, pro-survival and anti-survival-related genes. In the present study, Thymus vulgaris ethanol extract was purified repeatedly to produce several compounds including the known flavanone, Nar which was identified using different spectral techniques. Nar was shown to inhibit both human colorectal and breast cancer cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner through cell cycle arrest at S- and G2/M-phases accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death. Additionally, Nar altered the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle regulatory genes by down-regulating Cdk4, Cdk6, Cdk7, Bcl2, x-IAP and c-IAP-2 and up-regulating p18, p19, p21, caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9, Bak, AIF and Bax in both colorectal and breast cancer cells. Conversely, it diminished the expression levels of the cell survival factors PI3K, pAkt, pIκBα and NFκBp65. Moreover, Nar enhanced the sensitivity of colorectal and breast cancer cells to DNA-acting drugs. These findings provide evidence that Nar's pro-apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing effects are mediated by perturbation of cell cycle, upregulation of pro-apoptotic genes and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes and inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways. In conclusion, Nar might be a promising candidate for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy of human cancers. However, further studies exploring this therapeutic strategy are necessary.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Unknown 100 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Master 16 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 15%
Researcher 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 23 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 18 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Chemistry 4 4%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 30 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,136,750
of 8,760,756 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Cell International
#18
of 337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,093
of 209,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Cell International
#2
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,760,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 337 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,175 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.