↓ Skip to main content

Association between biomarkers of endothelial injury and hypocoagulability in patients with severe sepsis: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
89 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Association between biomarkers of endothelial injury and hypocoagulability in patients with severe sepsis: a prospective study
Published in
Critical Care, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-0918-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sisse Rye Ostrowski, Nicolai Haase, Rasmus Beier Müller, Morten Hylander Møller, Frank Christian Pott, Anders Perner, Pär Ingemar Johansson

Abstract

Patients with severe sepsis often present with concurrent coagulopathy, microcirculatory failure and evidence of vascular endothelial activation and damage. Given the critical role of the endothelium in balancing hemostasis, we investigated single-point associations between whole blood coagulopathy by thrombelastography (TEG) and plasma/serum markers of endothelial activation and damage in patients with severe sepsis. A post-hoc multicenter prospective observational study in a subgroup of 184 patients from the Scandinavian Starch for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock (6S) Trial. Study patients were admitted to two Danish intensive care units. Inclusion criteria were severe sepsis and pre-intervention whole blood TEG measurement and a plasma/serum research sample available from baseline (pre-intervention) for analysis of endothelial derived biomarkers. Endothelial derived biomarkers were measured in plasma/serum by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, protein C (PC), tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1). Pre-intervention TEG, functional fibrinogen (FF) and laboratory and clinical data, including mortality, were retrieved from the trial database. Most patients presented with septic shock (86%) and pulmonary (60%) or abdominal (30%) focus of infection. Median (IQR) age was 67 years (59-75), 55% were males. Median SOFA and SAPS II scores were 8 (6-10) and 56 (41-68), respectively, with 7-, 28- and 90-day mortality rates being 21%, 39% and 53%, respectively. Pre-intervention (before treatment with different fluids), TEG reaction (R)-time, angle and MA and FF MA all correlated with syndecan-1, thrombomodulin and PC levels and by multivariate linear regression analyses, higher syndecan-1 and lower PC were independently associated with TEG and FF hypocoagulability at this single time-point: 100 ng/ml higher syndecan-1 predicted 0.64 min higher R-time (SE 0.25), 1.78 mm lower (SE 0.87) TEG MA and 0.84 mm lower (SE 0.42) FF MA, all p < 0.05 and 10% lower protein C predicted 1.24 mm lower (SE 0.31) TEG MA. In our cohort of patients with severe sepsis, higher circulating levels of biomarkers of mainly endothelial damage were independently associated with hypocoagulability assessed by TEG and FF. Endothelial damage is intimately linked to coagulopathy in severe sepsis. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00962156 . Registered 13 July 2009.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 2 1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 131 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 15%
Student > Master 17 12%
Student > Postgraduate 11 8%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Other 30 22%
Unknown 22 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 73 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Engineering 4 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 33 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2015.
All research outputs
#8,256,316
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#3,345
of 4,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,379
of 231,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#15
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,941 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.