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Health-related quality of life determinants among Rwandan women after delivery: does antenatal care utilization matter? A cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, April 2018
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Title
Health-related quality of life determinants among Rwandan women after delivery: does antenatal care utilization matter? A cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41043-018-0142-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Regis Hitimana, Lars Lindholm, Gunilla Krantz, Manasse Nzayirambaho, Jeanine Condo, Jean Paul Semasaka Sengoma, Anni-Maria Pulkki-Brännström

Abstract

Despite the widespread use of antenatal care (ANC), its effectiveness in low-resource settings remains unclear. In this study, self-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was used as an alternative to other maternal health measures previously used to measure the effectiveness of antenatal care. The main objective of this study was to determine whether adequate antenatal care utilization is positively associated with women's HRQoL. Furthermore, the associations between the HRQoL during the first year (1-13 months) after delivery and socio-economic and demographic factors were explored in Rwanda. In 2014, we performed a cross-sectional population-based survey involving 922 women who gave birth 1-13 months prior to the data collection. The study population was randomly selected from two provinces in Rwanda, and a structured questionnaire was used. HRQoL was measured using the EQ-5D-3L and a visual analogue scale (VAS). The average HRQoL scores were computed by demographic and socio-economic characteristics. The effect of adequate antenatal care utilization on HRQoL was tested by performing two multivariable linear regression models with the EQ-5D and EQ-VAS scores as the outcomes and ANC utilization and socio-economic and demographic variables as the predictors. Adequate ANC utilization affected women's HRQoL when the outcome was measured using the EQ-VAS. Social support and living in a wealthy household were associated with a better HRQoL using both the EQ-VAS and EQ-5D. Cohabitating, and single/unmarried women exhibited significantly lower HRQoL scores than did married women in the EQ-VAS model, and women living in urban areas exhibited lower HRQoL scores than women living in rural areas in the ED-5D model. The effect of education on HRQoL was statistically significant using the EQ-VAS but was inconsistent across the educational categories. The women's age and the age of their last child were not associated with their HRQoL. ANC attendance of at least four visits should be further promoted and used in low-income settings. Strategies to improve families' socio-economic conditions and promote social networks among women, particularly women at the reproductive age, are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 5%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 35 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 20%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 41 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,068,064
of 12,861,409 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#152
of 286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,509
of 270,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,861,409 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 286 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,038 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.