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An evaluation on the effect of the copayment waiver policy for Korean hospitalized children under the age of six

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
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Title
An evaluation on the effect of the copayment waiver policy for Korean hospitalized children under the age of six
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0836-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sook Young Kwak, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh, Young-eun Kim

Abstract

In January 2006, the Korean government implemented a copayment waiver policy for hospitalized children under the age of 6 years to reduce the economic burden on patients. This policy was implemented from 2006 to 2007 in Korea and involved hospitalized children under the age of 6 years. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of the copayment waiver policy on health insurance beneficiaries. The change in medical service utilization before and after the policy implementation was analyzed using data from the national health insurance corporation (NHIC) and compared with medical aid beneficiaries who were already exempt from copayment. The "difference in difference" method was applied to determine the net effect of the copayment waiver policy. The net effect of policy implementation on NHIC beneficiaries was unclear by the "difference in difference" method because the number of inpatient days and hospital expenditure after policy implementation showed opposite results. The copayment waiver policy did not decrease the intensity of health care utilization when compared with the medical aid beneficiaries group. Among the NHIC beneficiaries, patients who utilized medical services for fatal disease and those with the low premiums group were more affected by the policy. The net effect of copayment waiver policy remains unclear. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the effects of policies implemented to reduce the economic burden on patients, such as the herein-described copayment waiver policy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 23%
Social Sciences 5 23%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2015.
All research outputs
#17,831,956
of 22,053,897 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#6,236
of 7,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,200
of 245,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#139
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,053,897 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.