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Simulation of alcohol action upon a detailed Purkinje neuron model and a simpler surrogate model that runs >400 times faster

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 1,234)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
20 Wikipedia pages
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
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Title
Simulation of alcohol action upon a detailed Purkinje neuron model and a simpler surrogate model that runs >400 times faster
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0162-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael D Forrest

Abstract

An approach to investigate brain function/dysfunction is to simulate neuron circuits on a computer. A problem, however, is that detailed neuron descriptions are computationally expensive and this handicaps the pursuit of realistic network investigations, where many neurons need to be simulated. We confront this issue; we employ a novel reduction algorithm to produce a 2 compartment model of the cerebellar Purkinje neuron from a previously published, 1089 compartment model. It runs more than 400 times faster and retains the electrical behavior of the full model. So, it is more suitable for inclusion in large network models, where computational power is a limiting issue. We show the utility of this reduced model by demonstrating that it can replicate the full model's response to alcohol, which can in turn reproduce experimental recordings from Purkinje neurons following alcohol application. We show that alcohol may modulate Purkinje neuron firing by an inhibition of their sodium-potassium pumps. We suggest that this action, upon cerebellar Purkinje neurons, is how alcohol ingestion can corrupt motor co-ordination. In this way, we relate events on the molecular scale to the level of behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
India 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 47 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 20%
Computer Science 8 16%
Engineering 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2022.
All research outputs
#1,046,200
of 22,464,753 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#21
of 1,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,134
of 246,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,464,753 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,234 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them