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Mistrust surrounding vaccination recommendations by the Japanese government: results from a national survey of working-age individuals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Mistrust surrounding vaccination recommendations by the Japanese government: results from a national survey of working-age individuals
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1772-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Koji Wada, Derek R Smith

Abstract

Considering that public attitudes on vaccine safety and effectiveness are known to influence the success of vaccination campaigns, an increased understanding of socio-demographic characteristics might help improve future communication strategies and lead to greater rates of vaccination uptake. This study investigated associations between mistrust for governmental vaccine recommendations and the socio-demographic characteristics of working-age individuals in Japan. A web-based, cross-sectional survey of vaccination attitudes was conducted among 3140 Japanese people aged 20 to 69 years. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine statistical associations between vaccination attitudes and socio-demographic characteristics, including the participant's most trusted information resources, demographic factors and general health conditions. A total of 893 (28.4%) individuals reported a general mistrust towards the Japanese government's recommendations for vaccination. Respondents who did not trust official government sources were more likely to consider friends, the internet and books (for both genders); family members and newspapers (among women only); and television (among men only), as the most trusted resources for vaccination-related information. Relatively poor health in men was associated with a general mistrust of vaccination recommendations (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 1.37, 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI): 1.07-1.69). A trend towards worsening general health was also associated with decreasing trust in vaccination recommendations by female respondents as follows: those reporting relatively good health (aOR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.02-1.47); relatively poor health (aOR: 1.55, 95%CI: 1.22-1.90); and poor health (aOR: 2.10, 95%CI: 1.41-2.63) (p for trend < 0.05). Overall, this study suggests that communication strategies for rebuilding public trust in vaccination safety need to be urgently addressed in Japan. Such protocols must consider the information sources that working-age populations are most likely to utilize in this country, as well as their general health conditions, especially among females.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Psychology 4 9%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2021.
All research outputs
#3,239,337
of 20,542,188 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,546
of 13,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,356
of 242,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,542,188 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,400 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them