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Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for resectable esophago-gastric adenocarcinoma: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, April 2015
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Title
Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for resectable esophago-gastric adenocarcinoma: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials
Published in
BMC Cancer, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1341-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tao Fu, Zhao-De Bu, Zi-Yu Li, Lian-Hai Zhang, Xiao-Jiang Wu, Ai-Wen Wu, Fei Shan, Xin Ji, Qiu-Shi Dong, Jia-Fu Ji

Abstract

The efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for advanced esophago-gastric adenocarcinoma are still in question, and the prognosis of these patients is poor. We systematically searched electronic databases from January 1990 to July 2014. The primary outcome was overall survival. The secondary outcomes were a R0 resection rate, positive rate of lymph node metastasis, postoperative recurrence rate, pathological complete response (pCR) rate and perioperative mortality. Overall survival was measured with a hazard ratio (HR), while other secondary outcomes were measured with an odds ratio (OR). Seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 1085 patients were searched and, of these, 869 had adenocarcinoma. Patients receiving preoperative CRT had a longer overall survival (HR 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.88), higher likelihood of R0 resection and greater chance of pCR, while they had a lower likelihood of lymph node metastasis and postoperative recurrence. The difference of perioperative mortality was non-significant. In addition, the result of the comparison between preoperative CRT and preoperative chemotherapy (CT) in two RCTs was non-significant. Patients with resectable esophago-gastric adenocarcinoma can gain a survival advantage from preoperative CRT. However, limited to the number of RCTs, the effect of adding radiotherapy to preoperative CT separately is still uncertain and more high-quality prospective trials are needed.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 8 17%
Other 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,323,028
of 5,032,982 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,535
of 2,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,513
of 155,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#118
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,032,982 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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