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Chromosomal evolution and phylogeny in the Nullicauda group (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae): evidence from multidirectional chromosome painting

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
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Title
Chromosomal evolution and phylogeny in the Nullicauda group (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae): evidence from multidirectional chromosome painting
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1176-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anderson José Baia Gomes, Cleusa Yoshiko Nagamachi, Luis Reginaldo Ribeiro Rodrigues, Malcolm Andrew Ferguson-Smith, Fengtang Yang, Patricia Caroline Mary O’Brien, Julio Cesar Pieczarka

Abstract

The family Phyllostomidae (Chiroptera) shows wide morphological, molecular and cytogenetic variation; many disagreements regarding its phylogeny and taxonomy remains to be resolved. In this study, we use chromosome painting with whole chromosome probes from the Phyllostomidae Phyllostomus hastatus and Carollia brevicauda to determine the rearrangements among several genera of the Nullicauda group (subfamilies Gliphonycterinae, Carolliinae, Rhinophyllinae and Stenodermatinae). These data, when compared with previously published chromosome homology maps, allow the construction of a phylogeny comparable to those previously obtained by morphological and molecular analysis. Our phylogeny is largely in agreement with that proposed with molecular data, both on relationships between the subfamilies and among genera; it confirms, for instance, that Carollia and Rhinophylla, previously considered as part of the same subfamily are, in fact, distant genera. The occurrence of the karyotype considered ancestral for this family in several different branches suggests that the diversification of Phyllostomidae into many subfamilies has occurred in a short period of time. Finally, the comparison with published maps using human whole chromosome probes allows us to track some syntenic associations prior to the emergence of this family.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 22%
Professor 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 22%
Unspecified 2 22%
Unknown 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,432,089
of 12,860,000 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,277
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Outputs of similar age
#233,751
of 269,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
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