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Associations between toe grip strength and hallux valgus, toe curl ability, and foot arch height in Japanese adults aged 20 to 79 years: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 440)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between toe grip strength and hallux valgus, toe curl ability, and foot arch height in Japanese adults aged 20 to 79 years: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0076-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daisuke Uritani, Takahiko Fukumoto, Daisuke Matsumoto, Masayuki Shima

Abstract

The associations between toe grip strength (TGS) and foot structure are not well known, although foot structure is inferred to affect TGS. This study investigated the associations between TGS and hallux valgus angle (HVA), toe curl ability, and foot arch height (FAH). This study analysed 227, 20 to 79-year-old, community-dwelling participants. TGS, HVA formed by the first metatarsal bone and the proximal phalanx of the hallux, toe curl ability (percentage) calculated as (foot length-flexed foot length)/foot length, and FAH (percentage) calculated as navicular height/truncated foot length were measured. To elucidate associations between TGS and foot structure, a correlation analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regression analyses were performed, based on the participant's sex. Pearson's correlation coefficients for TGS with age, height, weight, HVA, toe curl ability, and FAH were also calculated. In the stepwise, multivariate linear regression analyses, the independent variable was TGS and the dependent variables were those that significantly correlated with TGS, as shown by the Pearson's correlation coefficients. The significance level was set at 5%. According to the Pearson's correlation coefficients, in men, TGS was significantly correlated with age, height, toe curl ability, and FAH. According to the stepwise multiple regression analysis, TGS correlated with age and toe curl ability (adjusted R(2)=0.22). In women, TGS was significantly correlated with age, height, and toe curl ability (adjusted R(2)=0.40). TGS was associated with toe curl ability in both men and women. However, TGS was not associated with HVA and FAH in men or women. The results of this study may lead to the development of effective interventions to improve TGS. However, factors other than structure of the foot require more detailed investigation to clarify the factors contributing to TGS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Master 6 11%
Other 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 23%
Sports and Recreations 11 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Engineering 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 13 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2015.
All research outputs
#510,292
of 9,993,811 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#37
of 440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,290
of 212,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,993,811 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,042 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.