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Overcoming barriers to recruiting ethnic minorities to mental health research: a typology of recruitment strategies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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51 Dimensions

Readers on

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128 Mendeley
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Title
Overcoming barriers to recruiting ethnic minorities to mental health research: a typology of recruitment strategies
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0484-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Waquas Waheed, Adwoa Hughes-Morley, Adrine Woodham, Gill Allen, Peter Bower

Abstract

The ethnic minority population in developed countries is increasing over time. These groups are at higher risk of mental illness and demonstrate lower participation in research. Published evidence suggests that multiple factors like stigma, lack of trust, differences in explanatory models, logistical issues and lack of culturally aware researchers act as barriers to ethnic minority recruitment into mental health research. To reduce inequalities in participation, there is a need to devise innovative and culturally sensitive recruitment strategies. It is important that researchers share their experience of employing these strategies so that ethnic minority participation can be facilitated. We previously published a systematic review of barriers to recruiting ethnic minority participants into mental health research. The nine papers included in our prior review formed the basis for developing a typology of barriers to recruiting ethnic minorities into mental health research. This typology identified 33 barriers, described under five themes. We further extracted data on the strategies used to overcome these recruitment barriers, as described in the included studies. The strategies employed by the authors could be matched to all but two barriers (psychopathology/substance misuse and limited resource availability). There was evidence that multiple strategies were employed, and that these depended upon the population, clinical set-up and resources available. This typology of strategies to overcome barriers to recruiting ethnic minorities provides guidance on achieving higher rates of recruitment. It is important that researchers plan to deploy these strategies well in advance of initiating recruitment. Whilst adopting these strategies, the authors have not been able to quantify the positive impact of these strategies on recruitment. The typology should encourage researchers to employ these strategies in future research, refine them further and quantitatively evaluate their impact.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 128 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 126 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 16%
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 9%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 5%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 22 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2017.
All research outputs
#3,651,823
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,363
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,388
of 229,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them