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A step-wise approach towards introduction of an alcohol based hand rub, and implementation of front line ownership- using a, rural, tertiary care hospital in central India as a model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
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Title
A step-wise approach towards introduction of an alcohol based hand rub, and implementation of front line ownership- using a, rural, tertiary care hospital in central India as a model
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0840-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megha Sharma, Rita Joshi, Harshada Shah, Ragini Macaden, Cecilia Stålsby Lundborg

Abstract

Appropriate hand hygiene is a gold standard to combat healthcare associated infections (HAIs). The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended alcohol based hand rub (ABHR) as the most effective tool to maintain hand hygiene. In resource poor settings commercially available ABHR is not "economically accessible". The objectives of this study were to assess the acceptability of, and to build confidence for an in-house prepared (based on WHO guidelines) alcohol based hand rub among healthcare workers (HCWs) using a rural, tertiary care hospital in central India as an example. A series of activities were developed and conducted based on the Precede-Proceed model, the Trans Theoretical model of behaviour change, Front line ownership and Social marketing. A modified WHO-ABHR formulation, the 'test product' and 'WHO product evaluation form' were used for self assessment of acceptability of the 'test product'. Confidence building activities, as finger tip culture, visual portrayal method and handmade posters, were used in high-risk wards for HAIs, to build confidence for the 'test product' in removing transient flora from the hands. A locally developed feedback from was used to evaluate the impact of the activities conducted. Overall 183 HCWs were enrolled for the assessment of the 'test product' (130- doctors and 53 nurses). Out of these 83% (108/130) doctors and 94% (50/53) nurses were satisfied with the 'test product'. The confidence building activity was conducted with 116 participants (49 doctors). After single use of the 'Micro Kavach', overall a significant reduction was observed for the CFUs on the blood agar plates (0.77 Log(10), p < 0.001). A complete reduction (100%) in colony forming units on incubated blood agar plates was seen for 13% (15/116) participants. Eighty two percent (95/116) participants expressed their confidence in the 'test product'. The self reported acceptance level for the 'test product' was high. The use of finger tip culture coupled with the visual portrayal was perceived as a convincing and highly effective way to develop confidence in HCWs. Thus, is the foremost step towards successful introduction of ABHR and can be seen as a model for similar settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 22 29%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 21%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Psychology 4 5%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2015.
All research outputs
#5,490,432
of 9,728,122 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,402
of 3,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,242
of 212,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#73
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,728,122 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,496 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.