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Ethnoveterinary plants and practices used for ecto-parasite control in semi-arid smallholder farming areas of Zimbabwe

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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108 Mendeley
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Title
Ethnoveterinary plants and practices used for ecto-parasite control in semi-arid smallholder farming areas of Zimbabwe
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0006-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel Tendai Nyahangare, Brighton Marimanzi Mvumi, Tonderai Mutibvu

Abstract

The inclusion of traditional plant-based ecto-parasite control methods in primary health care of livestock is increasingly becoming an important intervention for improving livestock productivity in resource-challenged smallholder farming areas. In this study, commonly used plants used for the control of cattle ticks and other pests were identified through a survey in four semi-arid districts of Zimbabwe. A standard structured questionnaire with details of demographics, socioeconomic status of households, livestock parasites, control practices and list of ethnoveterinary plants used was used to interview 233 knowledgeable smallholder farmers in four districts. Focus group discussions with community members further provided insights on how the plants were being used and other issues surrounding ecto-parasite control and indigenous knowledge systems in the study areas. It was mostly, the older generation (>40 years) of the respondents who were knowledgeable about ethnoveterinary plants and practices. A total of 51 plant species were reported as being effective against cattle ticks and other livestock parasites. The top four popular plants by frequency of mention were, in descending order, Cissus quadrangularis (30.1 %), Lippia javanica (19.6 %), Psydrax livida (14.9 %) and Aloe sp (14.9%). Most of the plant materials were prepared by crushing and soaking the fresh leaves/bark in water and spraying the extract on animals. Despite the knowledge of these useful pesticidal plants, the preferred animal health care for cattle and other highly ranked livestock species is still the use of commercial acaricides. Traditional knowledge and plants are considered only as an alternative in the absence of conventional synthetic products. There are a variety of plants species that communities know of that can be used for livestock parasite control. However, the plant species are mostly used to complement commercial products when they are easily accessible. More work, is required to confirm the acaricidal properties claimed by the farmers in order to optimize and promote sustainable use of these plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Zimbabwe 2 2%
Unknown 106 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 19%
Student > Master 18 17%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 30%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 11%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 30 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2020.
All research outputs
#9,690,577
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#389
of 671 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,866
of 235,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 671 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,647 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.