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Cognitive-behavioural therapy has no effect on disease activity but improves quality of life in subgroups of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

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183 Mendeley
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Title
Cognitive-behavioural therapy has no effect on disease activity but improves quality of life in subgroups of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12876-015-0278-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonina Mikocka-Walus, Peter Bampton, David Hetzel, Patrick Hughes, Adrian Esterman, Jane M Andrews

Abstract

Studies have demonstrated usefulness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in managing distress in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, few have focused on IBD course. The present trial aimed to investigate whether adding CBT to standard treatment prolongs remission in IBD in comparison to standard therapy alone. A 2-arm parallel pragmatic randomised controlled trial (+CBT - standard care plus either face-to-face (F2F) or online over 10 weeks versus standard care alone (SC)) was conducted with adult patients in remission. IBD remission at 12 months since baseline was the primary outcome measure while the secondary outcome measures were mental health status and quality of life (QoL). Linear mixed-effect models were used to compare groups on outcome variables while controlling for baseline. Participants were 174 patients with IBD (90 + CBT, 84 SC). There was no difference in remission rates between groups, with similar numbers flaring at 12 months. Groups did not differ in anxiety, depression or coping at 6 or 12 months (p > 0.05). When only participants classified as 'in need' (young, high baseline IBD activity, recently diagnosed; poor mental health) were examined in the post-hoc analysis (n = 74, 34 CBT and 40 controls), CBT significantly improved mental QoL (p = .034, d = .56) at 6 months. Online CBT group had a higher score on Precontemplation than the F2F group, which is consistent with less developed coping with IBD in the cCBT group (p = .045). Future studies should direct psychological interventions to patients 'in need' and attempt to recruit larger samples to compensate for significant attrition when using online CBT. The protocol was registered on 21/10/2009 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ID: ACTRN12609000913279 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 183 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 14%
Student > Master 23 13%
Researcher 19 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Other 33 18%
Unknown 56 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 51 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 5%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 62 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2019.
All research outputs
#3,810,175
of 15,045,842 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#192
of 970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,030
of 230,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,045,842 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 970 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,432 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them