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Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 1,790)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
63 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
142 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
400 Mendeley
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Title
Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13058-015-0571-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carol J Fabian, Bruce F Kimler, Stephen D Hursting

Abstract

Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-κB-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 63 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 400 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 394 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 75 19%
Student > Master 70 18%
Researcher 43 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 9%
Other 27 7%
Other 85 21%
Unknown 63 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 104 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 44 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 24 6%
Other 49 12%
Unknown 75 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2021.
All research outputs
#355,644
of 19,545,556 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#35
of 1,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,127
of 240,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,545,556 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,790 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them