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Oligocene niche shift, Miocene diversification – cold tolerance and accelerated speciation rates in the St. John’s Worts (Hypericum, Hypericaceae)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

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144 Mendeley
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Title
Oligocene niche shift, Miocene diversification – cold tolerance and accelerated speciation rates in the St. John’s Worts (Hypericum, Hypericaceae)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0359-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicolai M Nürk, Simon Uribe-Convers, Berit Gehrke, David C Tank, Frank R Blattner

Abstract

Our aim is to understand the evolution of species-rich plant groups that shifted from tropical into cold/temperate biomes. It is well known that climate affects evolutionary processes, such as how fast species diversify, species range shifts, and species distributions. Many plant lineages may have gone extinct in the Northern Hemisphere due to Late Eocene climate cooling, while some tropical lineages may have adapted to temperate conditions and radiated; the hyper-diverse and geographically widespread genus Hypericum is one of these. To investigate the effect of macroecological niche shifts on evolutionary success we combine historical biogeography with analyses of diversification dynamics and climatic niche shifts in a phylogenetic framework. Hypericum evolved cold tolerance c. 30 million years ago, and successfully colonized all ice-free continents, where today ~500 species exist. The other members of Hypericaceae stayed in their tropical habitats and evolved into ~120 species. We identified a 15-20 million year lag between the initial change in temperature preference in Hypericum and subsequent diversification rate shifts in the Miocene. Contrary to the dramatic niche shift early in the evolution of Hypericum most extant species occur in temperate climates including high elevations in the tropics. These cold/temperate niches are a distinctive characteristic of Hypericum. We conclude that the initial release from an evolutionary constraint (from tropical to temperate climates) is an important novelty in Hypericum. However, the initial shift in the adaptive landscape into colder climates appears to be a precondition, and may not be directly related to increased diversification rates. Instead, subsequent events of mountain formation and further climate cooling may better explain distribution patterns and species-richness in Hypericum. These findings exemplify important macroevolutionary patterns of plant diversification during large-scale global climate change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Slovakia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 139 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 35 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 16%
Researcher 20 14%
Student > Master 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 21 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 87 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 10%
Environmental Science 9 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 25 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,141,180
of 6,744,370 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#555
of 1,764 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,426
of 199,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#26
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,744,370 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,764 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.