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Development of a process to disclose amyloid imaging results to cognitively normal older adult research participants

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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68 Dimensions

Readers on

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86 Mendeley
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Title
Development of a process to disclose amyloid imaging results to cognitively normal older adult research participants
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13195-015-0112-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin Harkins, Pamela Sankar, Reisa Sperling, Joshua D Grill, Robert C Green, Keith A Johnson, Megan Healy, Jason Karlawish

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop a process to maximize the safety and effectiveness of disclosing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) amyloid imaging results to cognitively normal older adults participating in Alzheimer's disease secondary prevention studies such as the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease (A4) Study. Using a modified Delphi Method to develop consensus on best practices, we gathered and analyzed data over three rounds from experts in two relevant fields: informed consent for genetic testing or human amyloid imaging. Experts reached consensus on (1) text for a brochure that describes amyloid imaging to a person who is considering whether to undergo such imaging in the context of a clinical trial, and (2) a process for amyloid PET result disclosure within such trials. Recommendations included: During consent, potential participants should complete an educational session, where they receive verbal and written information covering what is known and unknown about amyloid imaging, including possible results and their meaning, implications of results for risk of future cognitive decline, and information about Alzheimer's and risk factors. Participants should be screened for anxiety and depression to determine suitability to receive amyloid imaging information. The person conducting the sessions should check comprehension and be skilled in communication and recognizing distress. Imaging should occur on a separate day from consent, and disclosure on a separate day from imaging. Disclosure should occur in person, with time for questions. At disclosure, investigators should assess mood and willingness to receive results, and provide a written results report. Telephone follow-up within a few days should assess the impact of disclosure, and periodic scheduled assessments of depression and anxiety, with additional monitoring and follow-up for participants showing distress, should be performed. We developed a document for use with potential study participants to describe the process of amyloid imaging and the implications of amyloid imaging results; and a disclosure process with attention to ongoing monitoring of both mood and safety to receive this information. This document and process will be used in the A4 Study and can be adapted for other research settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 84 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Professor 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 20 23%
Unknown 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 28%
Psychology 13 15%
Neuroscience 10 12%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 18 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,234,651
of 12,978,654 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#224
of 567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,990
of 228,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,978,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,298 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them