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Sedentary behaviour and physical activity in bronchiectasis: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 1,344)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
35 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
128 Mendeley
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Title
Sedentary behaviour and physical activity in bronchiectasis: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0046-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Judy M Bradley, Jason J Wilson, Kate Hayes, Lisa Kent, Suzanne McDonough, Mark A Tully, Ian Bradbury, Alison Kirk, Denise Cosgrove, Rory Convery, Martin Kelly, Joseph Stuart Elborn, Brenda O’Neill

Abstract

The impact of bronchiectasis on sedentary behaviour and physical activity is unknown. It is important to explore this to identify the need for physical activity interventions and how to tailor interventions to this patient population. We aimed to explore the patterns and correlates of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in bronchiectasis. Physical activity was assessed in 63 patients with bronchiectasis using an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer over seven days. Patients completed: questionnaires on health-related quality-of-life and attitudes to physical activity (questions based on an adaption of the transtheoretical model (TTM) of behaviour change); spirometry; and the modified shuttle test (MST). Multiple linear regression analysis using forward selection based on likelihood ratio statistics explored the correlates of sedentary behaviour and physical activity dimensions. Between-group analysis using independent sample t-tests were used to explore differences for selected variables. Fifty-five patients had complete datasets. Average daily time, mean(standard deviation) spent in sedentary behaviour was 634(77)mins, light-lifestyle physical activity was 207(63)mins and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 25(20)mins. Only 11% of patients met recommended guidelines. Forced expiratory volume in one-second percentage predicted (FEV1% predicted) and disease severity were not correlates of sedentary behaviour or physical activity. For sedentary behaviour, decisional balance 'pros' score was the only correlate. Performance on the MST was the strongest correlate of physical activity. In addition to the MST, there were other important correlate variables for MVPA accumulated in ≥10-minute bouts (QOL-B Social Functioning) and for activity energy expenditure (Body Mass Index and QOL-B Respiratory Symptoms). Patients with bronchiectasis demonstrated a largely inactive lifestyle and few met the recommended physical activity guidelines. Exercise capacity was the strongest correlate of physical activity, and dimensions of the QOL-B were also important. FEV1% predicted and disease severity were not correlates of sedentary behaviour or physical activity. The inclusion of a range of physical activity dimensions could facilitate in-depth exploration of patterns of physical activity. This study demonstrates the need for interventions targeted at reducing sedentary behaviour and increasing physical activity, and provides information to tailor interventions to the bronchiectasis population. NCT01569009 ("Physical Activity in Bronchiectasis").

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 128 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 126 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 17%
Researcher 14 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 25 20%
Unknown 21 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 16%
Sports and Recreations 11 9%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Psychology 4 3%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 33 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2015.
All research outputs
#737,644
of 16,623,170 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#25
of 1,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,858
of 234,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,623,170 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,344 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them