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In vivo efficacy of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of asymptomatic parasitaemia in pregnant women in Machinga District, Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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103 Mendeley
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Title
In vivo efficacy of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of asymptomatic parasitaemia in pregnant women in Machinga District, Malawi
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0710-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie Gutman, Dyson Mwandama, Ryan E Wiegand, Joseph Abdallah, Nnaemeka C Iriemenam, Ya Ping Shi, Don P Mathanga, Jacek Skarbinski

Abstract

The effectiveness of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) might be compromised by high prevalence of resistance-associated Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) mutations. As a proxy for IPTp-SP effectiveness, the in vivo efficacy of SP to clear parasitaemia and prevent reinfection in asymptomatic parasitaemic pregnant women in an area with high SP resistance prevalence was assessed. Pregnant women 16-26 weeks' gestation with asymptomatic parasitaemia presenting for antenatal care were given IPTp-SP and followed for 42 days. The primary outcome was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) uncorrected 42-day survival rate; the per cent of patients without recrudescence or reinfection by day 42. PCR was used to distinguish recrudescence from reinfection. DNA was sequenced to detect resistance-associated dhfr and dhps mutations. Of 245 pregnant women included in the intention-to-treat analysis, 93.9% cleared their parasitaemia by day 7. The day 42 PCR-uncorrected survival rate was 58.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 51.5-65.7) and day 42 PCR-corrected survival was 68.7% (CI 61.4-76.0). Recrudescence was more common among primi- than among multigravid women; recrudescence rate 33.3% (CI 25.1-42.4%) versus 21.4% (CI 15.0-29.0%) (log rank test p-value 0.006). The quintuple mutant was present in nearly all samples (95%), while 2% were sextuple mutants with an additional mutation at dhps A581G. SP efficacy for acute malaria treatment has been compromised by resistance, but SP retains partial activity among pregnant women with asymptomatic parasitaemia, and thus might be useful for IPTp. Nonetheless, research on non-SP IPTp regimens should continue. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01120145 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 102 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 20%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 4%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 23 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,917,066
of 7,369,149 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,096
of 2,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,526
of 205,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#55
of 118 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,369,149 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,451 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 118 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.