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Microarray transcriptional profiling of Arctic Mesorhizobium strain N33 at low temperature provides insights into cold adaption strategies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Microarray transcriptional profiling of Arctic Mesorhizobium strain N33 at low temperature provides insights into cold adaption strategies
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1611-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdollah-Fardin Ghobakhlou, Anne Johnston, Linda Harris, Hani Antoun, Serge Laberge

Abstract

Arctic Mesorhizobium strain N33 was isolated from nodules of the legume Oxytropis arctobia in Canada's eastern Arctic. This symbiotic bacterium can grow at temperatures ranging from 0 to 30 °C, fix nitrogen at 10 °C, and is one of the best known cold-adapted rhizobia. Despite the economic potential of this bacterium for northern regions, the key molecular mechanisms of its cold adaptation remain poorly understood. Using a microarray printed with 5760 Arctic Mesorhizobium genomic clones, we performed a partial transcriptome analysis of strain N33 grown under eight different temperature conditions, including both sustained and transient cold treatments, compared with cells grown at room temperature. Cells treated under constant (4 and 10 °C) low temperatures expressed a prominent number of induced genes distinct from cells treated to short-term cold-exposure (<60 min), but exhibited an intermediate expression profile when exposed to a prolonged cold exposure (240 min). The most prominent up-regulated genes encode proteins involved in metabolite transport, transcription regulation, protein turnover, oxidoreductase activity, cryoprotection (mannitol, polyamines), fatty acid metabolism, and membrane fluidity. The main categories of genes affected in N33 during cold treatment are sugar transport and protein translocation, lipid biosynthesis, and NADH oxidoreductase (quinone) activity. Some genes were significantly down-regulated and classified in secretion, energy production and conversion, amino acid transport, cell motility, cell envelope and outer membrane biogenesis functions. This might suggest growth cessation or reduction, which is an important strategy to adjust cellular function and save energy under cold stress conditions. Our analysis revealed a complex series of changes associated with cold exposure adaptation and constant growth at low temperatures. Moreover, it highlighted some of the strategies and different physiological states that Mesorhizobium strain N33 has developed to adapt to the cold environment of the Canadian high Arctic and has revealed candidate genes potentially involved in cold adaptation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 24%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Environmental Science 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2016.
All research outputs
#10,570,647
of 19,208,681 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,061
of 9,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,560
of 241,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,208,681 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,730 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,135 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them