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Selectively false-positive radionuclide scan in a patient with sarcoidosis and papillary thyroid cancer: a case report and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, May 2015
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 154)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Selectively false-positive radionuclide scan in a patient with sarcoidosis and papillary thyroid cancer: a case report and review of the literature
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0069-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole L Lebo, Francois Raymond, Michael J Odell

Abstract

Radioiodine and Tc-99 m pertechnetate scans are routinely relied upon to detect metastasis in papillary thyroid cancer; false-positive scans are relatively rare. To our knowledge, no published reports exist of sarcoidosis causing such selectively false-positive scans. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer (T1bN1aMx) in whom sarcoidosis-affected cervical and mediastinal lymph nodes demonstrated uptake of thyroid-targeting radionuclides. Only the minority of these nodes demonstrated radionuclide uptake, raising the suspicion of adjacent or coexisting sarcoid and metastatic involvement. Selective uptake of thyroid-targeted radionuclides by isolated sarcoidosis is, to our knowledge, a previously undocumented occurrence. Biopsies of uptake-negative mediastinal nodes revealed sarcoidosis. Pathology from a subsequent neck dissection excising uptake-positive cervical nodes also showed sarcoidosis, with no coinciding malignancy. We document a case of sarcoidosis causing a selectively false-positive thyroid scintigraphy scan. It is useful for clinicians to be aware of potential false-positives and deceptive patterns on radionuclide scans when managing patients with both well-differentiated thyroid cancer and a co-existing disease affecting the nodal basins draining the thyroid gland.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Psychology 1 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,696,706
of 5,103,864 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#42
of 154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,750
of 163,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,103,864 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.4. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,842 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.