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Diploid males support a two-step mechanism of endosymbiont-induced thelytoky in a parasitoid wasp

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

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8 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Diploid males support a two-step mechanism of endosymbiont-induced thelytoky in a parasitoid wasp
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0370-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wen-Juan Ma, Bart A. Pannebakker, Louis van de Zande, Tanja Schwander, Bregje Wertheim, Leo W. Beukeboom

Abstract

Haplodiploidy, where females develop from diploid, fertilized eggs and males from haploid, unfertilized eggs, is abundant in some insect lineages. Some species in these lineages reproduce by thelytoky that is caused by infection with endosymbionts: infected females lay haploid eggs that undergo diploidization and develop into females, while males are very rare or absent. It is generally assumed that in thelytokous wasps, endosymbionts merely diploidize the unfertilized eggs, which would then trigger female development. We found that females in the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica infected with thelytoky-inducing Wolbachia produce 0.7-1.2 % male offspring. Seven to 39 % of these males are diploid, indicating that diploidization and female development can be uncoupled in A. japonica. Wolbachia titer in adults was correlated with their ploidy and sex: diploids carried much higher Wolbachia titers than haploids, and diploid females carried more Wolbachia than diploid males. Data from introgression lines indicated that the development of diploid individuals into males instead of females is not caused by malfunction-mutations in the host genome but that diploid males are most likely produced when the endosymbiont fails to activate the female sex determination pathway. Our data therefore support a two-step mechanism by which endosymbionts induce thelytoky in A. japonica: diploidization of the unfertilized egg is followed by feminization, whereby each step correlates with a threshold of endosymbiont titer during wasp development. Our new model of endosymbiont-induced thelytoky overthrows the view that certain sex determination mechanisms constrain the evolution of endosymbiont-induced thelytoky in hymenopteran insects. Endosymbionts can cause parthenogenesis through feminization, even in groups in which endosymbiont-diploidized eggs would develop into males following the hosts' sex determination mechanism. In addition, our model broadens our understanding of the mechanisms by which endosymbionts induce thelytoky to enhance their transmission to the next generation. Importantly, it also provides a novel window to study the yet-poorly known haplodiploid sex determination mechanisms in haplodiploid insects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 3%
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 69 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 28%
Student > Master 16 22%
Researcher 15 20%
Professor 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 16%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Mathematics 1 1%
Unspecified 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2015.
All research outputs
#5,013,951
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,147
of 2,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,561
of 244,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them