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DNA methylation similarities in genes of black South Africans with systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, May 2015
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Title
DNA methylation similarities in genes of black South Africans with systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12929-015-0142-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Puleng Matatiele, Mohamed Tikly, Gareth Tarr, Mary Gulumian

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) are systemic autoimmune connective tissue diseases that share overlapping clinico-pathological features. It is highly probable that there is an overlap in epigenetic landscapes of both diseases. This study aimed to identify similarities in DNA methylation changes in genes involved in SLE and SSc. Global DNA methylation and twelve genes selected on the basis of their involvement in inflammation, autoimmunity and/or fibrosis were analyzed using PCR arrays in three groups, each of 30 Black South Africans with SLE and SSc, plus 40 healthy control subjects. Global methylation in both diseases was significantly lower (<25 %) than in healthy subjects (>30 %, p = 0.0000001). In comparison to healthy controls, a similar gene-specific methylation pattern was observed in both SLE and SSc. Three genes, namely; PRF1, ITGAL and FOXP3 were consistently hypermethylated while CDKN2A and CD70 were hypomethylated in both diseases. The other genes (SOCS1, CTGF, THY1, CXCR4, MT1-G, FLI1, and DNMT1) were generally hypomethylated in SLE whereas they were neither hyper- nor hypo-methylated in SSc. SSc and SLE patients have a higher global hypomethylation than healthy subjects with specific genes being hypomethylated and others hypermethylated. The majority of genes studied were hypomethylated in SLE compared to SSc. In addition to the commonly known hypomethylated genes in SLE and SSc, there are other hypomethylated genes (such as MT-1G and THY-1) that have not previously been investigated in SLE and SSc though are known to be hypermethylated in cancer.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Other 8 28%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,610,553
of 5,141,487 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#194
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,854
of 171,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,141,487 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 285 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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