↓ Skip to main content

Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly affect quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly affect quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12955-015-0243-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liming Zhu, Dan Huang, Lili Shi, Liexin Liang, Tao Xu, Min Chang, Wei Chen, Dong Wu, Facan Zhang, Xiucai Fang

Abstract

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL). Although intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, as well as comorbid psychological disorders, may reduce the QOL of IBS patients, the primary determinant of QOL in these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to identify the main factors affecting QOL in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D). Consecutive patients meeting the Rome III Diagnostic Criteria for IBS-D were enrolled in this study. Patients with organic diseases were excluded. The intestinal symptoms, psychological states and QOL of these patients were evaluated using IBS-specific symptom questionnaires, the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), and the Chinese version of the IBS-QOL instrument. Overall scores for intestinal symptoms were calculated by frequency and degree. This study enrolled 227 IBS-D patients, of mean age 44.68 ± 10.81 years. Their mean overall IBS-QOL score was 71.68 ± 18.54, with the lowest score being for food avoidance (53.71 ± 26.92). Overall IBS-QOL score correlated negatively with overall scores of intestinal symptoms and HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Overall intestinal symptoms scores correlated negatively with HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Scores of HAMD, HAMA and structural factors (i.e., anxiety/somatization, cognitive disorder, psychomotor retardation, psychic anxiety, and somatic anxiety) were significantly higher in female than in male patients (p < 0.01). Food avoidance and social reaction scores of female patients were significantly lower than those of male patients (p < 0.05 each). The degree of defecation urgency, frequency of passing mucus and psychomotor retardation were independent factors predicting reduced QOL in IBS-D patients. Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly reduce the QOL of IBS-D patients, with gender differences in the impact of both factors on QOL.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 18 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 14%
Psychology 9 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 22 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,196,206
of 5,045,006 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#574
of 649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,169
of 168,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#44
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,045,006 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 649 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 168,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.