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Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model

Overview of attention for article published in Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
patent
2 patents

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model
Published in
Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40425-015-0056-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael D Roth, Airi Harui

Abstract

The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating TIL. The immune system in NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice was reconstituted by the co-administration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or subsets (CD4+ or CD8+) and autologous human dendritic cells (DC), and animals simultaneously challenged by implanting human prostate cancer cells (PC3 line). Tumor growth was evaluated over time and the phenotype of recovered splenocytes and TIL characterized by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines were also assessed. A tumor-bearing huPBL-NSG model was established in which human leukocytes reconstituted secondary lymphoid organs and promoted the accumulation of TIL. These TIL exhibited a unique phenotype when compared to splenocytes with a predominance of CD8+ T cells that exhibited increased expression of CD69, CD56, and an effector memory phenotype. TIL from huPBL-NSG animals closely matched the features of TIL recovered from primary human prostate cancers. Human cytokines were readily detectible in the serum and exhibited a different profile in animals implanted with PBL alone, tumor alone, and those reconstituted with both. Immune reconstitution slowed but could not eliminate tumor growth and this effect required the presence of CD4+ T cell help. Simultaneous implantation of human PBL, DC and tumor results in a huPBL-NSG model that recapitulates the development of human TIL and allows an assessment of tumor and immune system interaction that cannot be carried out in humans. Furthermore, the capacity to manipulate individual features and cell populations provides an opportunity for hypothesis testing and outcome monitoring in a humanized system that may be more relevant than conventional mouse models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
France 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 51 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,727,016
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
#364
of 2,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,340
of 244,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them