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Identification of radiation-induced aberrant hypomethylation in colon cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2015
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17 Dimensions

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Title
Identification of radiation-induced aberrant hypomethylation in colon cancer
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1229-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jin-Han Bae, Joong-Gook Kim, Kyu Heo, Kwangmo Yang, Tae-Oh Kim, Joo Yi

Abstract

Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in the simultaneous activation or downregulation of multiple signaling pathways that play critical roles in cell type-specific control of survival or death. IR is a well-known genotoxic agent and human carcinogen that induces cellular damage through direct and indirect mechanisms. However, its impact on epigenetic mechanisms has not been elucidated, and more specifically, little information is available regarding genome-wide DNA methylation changes in cancer cells after IR exposure. Recently, genome-wide DNA methylation profiling technology using the Illumina HumanMethylation450K platform has emerged that allows us to query >450,000 loci within the genome. This improved technology is capable of identifying genome-wide DNA methylation changes in CpG islands and other CpG island-associated regions. In this study, we employed this technology to test the hypothesis that exposure to IR not only induces differential DNA methylation patterns at a genome-wide level, but also results in locus- and gene-specific DNA methylation changes. We screened for differential DNA methylation changes in colorectal cancer cells after IR exposure with 2 and 5 Gy. Twenty-nine genes showed radiation-induced hypomethylation in colon cancer cells, and of those, seven genes showed a corresponding increase in gene expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to confirm that the DNA-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) level associated with the promoter regions of these genes correlated with their methylation level and gene expression changes. Finally, we used a gene ontology (GO) database to show that a handful of hypomethylated genes induced by IR are associated with a variety of biological pathways related to cancer. We identified alterations in global DNA methylation patterns and hypomethylation at specific cancer-related genes following IR exposure, which suggests that radiation exposure plays a critical role in conferring epigenetic alterations in cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Researcher 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 17%
Computer Science 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,079,987
of 6,790,336 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#3,068
of 5,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,645
of 210,921 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#182
of 247 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,790,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,921 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 247 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.