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Olfactory testing in children using objective tools: comparison of Sniffin’ Sticks and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, March 2015
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Title
Olfactory testing in children using objective tools: comparison of Sniffin’ Sticks and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT)
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0061-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah C Hugh, Jennifer Siu, Thomas Hummel, Vito Forte, Paolo Campisi, Blake C Papsin, Evan J Propst

Abstract

Detection of olfactory dysfunction is important for fire and food safety. Clinical tests of olfaction have been developed for adults but their use in children has been limited because they were felt to be unreliable in children under six years of age. We therefore administered two olfactory tests to children and compared results across tests. Two olfactory tests (Sniffin' Sticks and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT)) were administered to 78 healthy children ages 3 to 12 years. Children were randomized to one of two groups: Group 1 performed the UPSIT first and Sniffin' Sticks second, and Group 2 performed Sniffin' Sticks first and UPSIT second. All children were able to complete both olfactory tests. Performance on both tests was similar for children 5 and 6 years of age. There was an age-dependent increase in score on both tests (p < .01). Children performed better on the Sniffin' Sticks than the UPSIT (65.3% versus 59.7%, p < .01). There was no difference in performance due to order of test presentation. The Sniffin' Sticks and UPSIT olfactory tests can both be completed by children as young as 5 years of age. Performance on both tests increased with increasing age. Better performance on the Sniffin' Sticks than the UPSIT may be due to a decreased number of test items, better ability to maintain attention, or decreased olfactory fatigue. The ability to reuse Sniffin' Sticks on multiple children may make it more practical for clinical use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 27%
Psychology 11 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,172,905
of 8,294,943 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#172
of 203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,715
of 219,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#10
of 10 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 203 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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