↓ Skip to main content

Antifungal wound penetration of amphotericin and voriconazole in combat-related injuries: case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Antifungal wound penetration of amphotericin and voriconazole in combat-related injuries: case report
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0918-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin S Akers, Matthew P Rowan, Krista L Niece, John C Graybill, Katrin Mende, Kevin K Chung, Clinton K Murray

Abstract

Survivors of combat trauma can have long and challenging recoveries, which may be complicated by infection. Invasive fungal infections are a rare but serious complication with limited treatment options. Currently, aggressive surgical debridement is the standard of care, with antifungal agents used adjunctively with uncertain efficacy. Anecdotal evidence suggests that antifungal agents may be ineffective in the absence of surgical debridement, and studies have yet to correlate antifungal concentrations in plasma and wounds. Here we report the systemic pharmacokinetics and wound effluent antifungal concentrations of five wounds from two male patients, aged 28 and 30 years old who sustained combat-related blast injuries in southern Afghanistan, with proven or possible invasive fungal infection. Our data demonstrate that while voriconazole sufficiently penetrated the wound resulting in detectable effluent levels, free amphotericin B (unbound to plasma) was not present in wound effluent despite sufficient concentrations in circulating plasma. In addition, considerable between-patient and within-patient variability was observed in antifungal pharmacokinetic parameters. These data highlight the need for further studies evaluating wound penetration of commonly used antifungals and the role for therapeutic drug monitoring in providing optimal care for critically ill and injured war fighters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Student > Postgraduate 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 55%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2021.
All research outputs
#12,901,059
of 19,519,615 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,785
of 6,783 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,142
of 244,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,519,615 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,783 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,767 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them