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Motivation to quit smoking among HIV-positive smokers in Vietnam

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Motivation to quit smoking among HIV-positive smokers in Vietnam
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1672-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nhung Thi Phuong Nguyen, Bach Xuan Tran, Lu Y Hwang, Christine M Markham, Michael D Swartz, Jennifer I Vidrine, Huong Thu Thi Phan, Carl A Latkin, Damon J Vidrine

Abstract

Smoking cessation is emerging as an important component in current HIV care to reduce smoking-related adverse health outcomes. This study aimed to examine motivation to quit and its associated factors in a sample of 409 HIV-positive smokers in Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January to September 2013 in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural city). Motivation to quit was measured by a 4-point single item, and was dichotomized as having any motivation versus no motivation. Smoking history, nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence), and other covariates were self-reported by participants. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of motivation to quit. The sample was mostly male (97%). Mean age was 36 years (SD = 5.8). Approximately 37% and 69% of the sample were hazardous drinkers and ever drug users, respectively. The mean duration of HIV infection and ART treatment were 6 years (SD = 3.6) and 5 years (SD = 2.2), respectively. Overall, 59% of the sample was motivated to quit. Factors significantly associated with motivation to quit were income, pain, currently taking Methadone, and the interaction between binge drinking and lifetime drug use. Individuals with the highest income level (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6), moderate income level (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-3.1), and currently feeling pain (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.5) were more likely to be motivated to quit. Conversely, taking Methadone was associated with a lower likelihood of motivation to quit (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.9). Also, those who reported binge drinking only (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9), lifetime drug use only (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1, 0.7), or both substance uses (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8) were less motivated to quit smoking. Smoking cessation treatment should be integrated into HIV care in Vietnam, and should be tailored to meet specific needs for individuals with different attitudes on smoking, low income, and polysubstance use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 30%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 16%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 24%
Psychology 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2015.
All research outputs
#5,141,921
of 9,726,436 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,277
of 7,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,504
of 224,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#167
of 234 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,726,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,584 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 234 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.