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Soluble factors from biofilms of wound pathogens modulate human bone marrow-derived stromal cell differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and cytokine secretion

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Soluble factors from biofilms of wound pathogens modulate human bone marrow-derived stromal cell differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and cytokine secretion
Published in
BMC Microbiology, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0412-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine L Ward, Carlos J Sanchez Jr, Beth E Pollot, Desiree R Romano, Sharanda K Hardy, Sandra C Becerra, Christopher R Rathbone, Joseph C Wenke

Abstract

Chronic, non-healing wounds are often characterized by the persistence of bacteria within biofilms - aggregations of cells encased within a self-produced polysaccharide matrix. Biofilm bacteria exhibit unique characteristics from planktonic, or culture-grown, bacterial phenotype, including diminished responses to antimicrobial therapy and persistence against host immune responses. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are host cells characterized by their multifunctional ability to undergo differentiation into multiple cell types and modulation of host-immune responses by secreting factors that promote wound healing. While these characteristics make MSCs an attractive therapeutic for wounds, these pro-healing activities may be differentially influenced in the context of an infection (i.e., biofilm related infections) within chronic wounds. Herein, we evaluated the effect of soluble factors derived from biofilms of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the viability, differentiation, and paracrine activity of human MSCs to evaluate the influence of biofilms on MSC activity in vitro. Exposure of MSCs to biofilm-conditioned medias of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa resulted in reductions in cell viability, in part due to activation of apoptosis. Similarly, exposure to soluble factors from biofilms was also observed to diminish the migration ability of cells and to hinder multi-lineage differentiation of MSCs. In contrast to these findings, exposure of MSCs to soluble factors from biofilms resulted in significant increases in the release of paracrine factors involved in inflammation and wound healing. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that factors produced by biofilms can negatively impact the intrinsic properties of MSCs, in particular limiting the migratory and differentiation capacity of MSCs. Consequently, these studies suggest use/application of stem-cell therapies in the context of infection may have a limited therapeutic effect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 60 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 21%
Student > Master 13 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#12,217,627
of 21,252,842 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,126
of 3,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,382
of 248,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,252,842 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,041 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,608 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them