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ACTN4 and the pathways associated with cell motility and adhesion contribute to the process of lung cancer metastasis to the brain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, April 2015
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Title
ACTN4 and the pathways associated with cell motility and adhesion contribute to the process of lung cancer metastasis to the brain
Published in
BMC Cancer, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1295-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yufei Gao, Guanghu Li, Liankun Sun, Yichun He, Xiaoyan Li, Zhi Sun, Jihan Wang, Yang Jiang, Jingwei Shi

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify critical gene pathways that are associated with lung cancer metastasis to the brain. The RNA-Seq approach was used to establish the expression profiles of a primary lung cancer, adjacent benign tissue, and metastatic brain tumor from a single patient. The expression profiles of these three types of tissues were compared to define differentially expressed genes, followed by serial-cluster analysis, gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis, and knowledge-driven network analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to validate the expression of essential candidate genes in tissues from ten additional patients. Differential gene expression among these three types of tissues was classified into multiple clusters according to the patterns of their alterations. Further bioinformatic analysis of these expression profile data showed that the network of the signal transduction pathways related to actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell migration, and adhesion was associated with lung cancer metastasis to the brain. The expression of ACTN4 (actinin, alpha 4), a cytoskeleton protein gene essential for cytoskeleton organization and cell motility, was significantly elevated in the metastatic brain tumor but not in the primary lung cancer tissue. The signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cytoskeleton reorganization, cell motility, and focal adhesion play a role in the process of lung cancer metastasis to the brain. The contribution of ACTN4 to the process of lung cancer metastasis to the brain could be mainly through regulation of actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell motility, and focal adhesion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 37%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Engineering 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2016.
All research outputs
#15,391,100
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#4,395
of 6,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,579
of 244,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,931 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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